Wise Owl Shopper Discounts

lift

Dualit 4-Slot Vario Toaster 40352 – Silver – Special

IDEABRIGHT LTD DESCRIPTION

Dualit Vario 4 Slice Toaster Polished Stainless steel 40352

– This smart looking Dualit 40352 Vario 4-Slice Toaster in stainless steel is hand-made in the UK, with the emphasis being placed on high quality manufacture and service.

– Heat is provided by Dualit’s award-winning and patented ProHeat elements.

– The Dualit 40352 Vario 4-Slice Toaster features extra-wide 28mm slots with adjustable inner wire guards to grip the toast.

– Variable browning is achieved by setting a mechanical timer, which lets you know when your toast is ready.

– A manually operated eject lever means you can remove your toast immediately, or leave it in the toaster to keep warm until needed.

– Dualit offer a high quality after-sales repair service for their products, assuring you of many years of use from

– Selector control for heating two or all four slots.

– Award-winning ProHeat elements, guaranteed for two years.

– Handmade in the UK.

– Mechanical timer.

– Manually operated eject lever to keep items warm until needed.

– High lift mechanism to remove small items easily.

– Extra-wide 28mm slots and adjustable inner wire guard to grip toast.

– Replaceable parts (you don’t throw a Dualit toaster away, they repair it for you!)

– Adjustable rear foot to compensate for uneven surfaces.

– Removable crumb tray.

  • Style-conscious design – ideal choice for a commercial kitchen
  • Extra wide 28 mm slots
  • Manual ejector system
  • Removable crumb tray
  • Optional sandwich cage

More Promoted: Sale Category

Too rocky to pedal? PeakRider lets you carry your bike on your back

Why it matters to you

The handy PeakRider device will save your arms and shoulders on those hike-a-bike occasions when you have to stop and carry your bicycle. At its best, mountain biking is pretty darn awesome[1], providing great views, an all-too-rare chance to get back to nature, and a fitness regimen that beats the hell out of the treadmill. One time when it’s less than awesome?

Those “hike-a-bike” moments when you’re forced to carry your bike for long stints over rough terrain. Fortunately, German cyclist Marvin Kiesel is here to help, courtesy of his PeakRider[2] invention, a handy bike-carrying system that leaves your hands free. Not only does it increase safety, but it also promises to go much easier on your back, while saving you from aching shoulders and tired arms.

PeakRider is basically a telescoping pole that fits into your backpack and connects — via a special pouch — to your bike. As it creator explains: “Simply attach the PeakRider cone strap at your bike’s barycenter and lift your ride onto the rod. That’s it.” The resulting lightweight rig, weighing just 190 grams, then allows you to carry your bike on your back with perfect weight distribution across your back and hips.

Kiesel told Digital Trends he wanted to create a method taht would make “it easy and pleasant to wear a bicycle.” While we’re yet to try out the PeakRider, it’s certainly got the makings of an intuitive solution to a problem lots of folks have probably had. “I came up with the idea about two years ago when I was dismantling my bike to attach it to my backpack,” he said. “I was doing a tour where you needed both of your hands to hold onto the ground, and that could only happen I physically attached the bike to my rucksack.

But I wasn’t pleased with that solution, so started thinking about a better one.” For those who are interested, PeakRider is currently available to pre-order on Kickstarter[3]. It will set you back around £65 for a single unit, a 25 percent savings on the eventual retail price.

Higher price points are also available with additional discounts.

Shipping is set to take place in February 2018.

One of the year’s most potentially useful pieces of bike tech[4], anyone?

References

  1. ^ mountain biking is pretty darn awesome (www.digitaltrends.com)
  2. ^ PeakRider (www.peak-rider.com)
  3. ^ currently available to pre-order on Kickstarter (www.kickstarter.com)
  4. ^ pieces of bike tech (www.digitaltrends.com)

Too rocky to pedal? PeakRider lets you carry your bike on your back

Why it matters to you

The handy PeakRider device will save your arms and shoulders on those hike-a-bike occasions when you have to stop and carry your bicycle. At its best, mountain biking is pretty darn awesome[1], providing great views, an all-too-rare chance to get back to nature, and a fitness regimen that beats the hell out of the treadmill. One time when it’s less than awesome?

Those “hike-a-bike” moments when you’re forced to carry your bike for long stints over rough terrain. Fortunately, German cyclist Marvin Kiesel is here to help, courtesy of his PeakRider[2] invention, a handy bike-carrying system that leaves your hands free. Not only does it increase safety, but it also promises to go much easier on your back, while saving you from aching shoulders and tired arms.

PeakRider is basically a telescoping pole that fits into your backpack and connects — via a special pouch — to your bike. As it creator explains: “Simply attach the PeakRider cone strap at your bike’s barycenter and lift your ride onto the rod. That’s it.” The resulting lightweight rig, weighing just 190 grams, then allows you to carry your bike on your back with perfect weight distribution across your back and hips.

Kiesel told Digital Trends he wanted to create a method taht would make “it easy and pleasant to wear a bicycle.” While we’re yet to try out the PeakRider, it’s certainly got the makings of an intuitive solution to a problem lots of folks have probably had. “I came up with the idea about two years ago when I was dismantling my bike to attach it to my backpack,” he said. “I was doing a tour where you needed both of your hands to hold onto the ground, and that could only happen I physically attached the bike to my rucksack.

But I wasn’t pleased with that solution, so started thinking about a better one.” For those who are interested, PeakRider is currently available to pre-order on Kickstarter[3]. It will set you back around £65 for a single unit, a 25 percent savings on the eventual retail price.

Higher price points are also available with additional discounts.

Shipping is set to take place in February 2018.

One of the year’s most potentially useful pieces of bike tech[4], anyone?

References

  1. ^ mountain biking is pretty darn awesome (www.digitaltrends.com)
  2. ^ PeakRider (www.peak-rider.com)
  3. ^ currently available to pre-order on Kickstarter (www.kickstarter.com)
  4. ^ pieces of bike tech (www.digitaltrends.com)

1 2 3 52
Categories