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Num Noms Deluxe packs Jelly Bean multicoloured

Nums are adorable, scented, squishy characters with tons of personality. Noms are motorised mischievous characters that move around and they’re scented too! Stack the Nums on top of the Noms to make over 1,000 scented combinations. Mix and match Num Noms to create sweet, scented recipes! Collect over 60 flavours with these deluxe packs! The Jelly Bean is perfect for those who have a craving for fruity sweets! You Might Find Ultra Rare Diamond Edition Num Noms in This Deluxe Pack! Mr. & Mrs. Icing Are Hiding in Some Specially Marked Jelly Bean and Brunch Deluxe Packs! The Num Noms smell so delicious! Mix ‘n’ match Nums and Noms to create wacky flavour and scent combos! Watch them scurry around! Includes 5 jelly bean Nums, 2 motorized Noms, 1 jelly bean container, 1 jelly bean accessory, and 1 collector’s menu. Requires 2x LR44 batteries (Included)

  • 6 scented Nums in a variety of scents – Blueberry, Cream Berry, Pino, Kiwi, Raspberry and a mystery scent
  • Includes one Mystery – There is a chance to find the ULTRA RARE Diamond Edition in each pack!! (Note: Mystery Styles will vary)
  • 2 scented motorised Noms flavoured Cherry and Mango
  • Includes collector’s menu, tray and spatula to scoop ’em up
  • Over 1000 mix and match combos to sample!

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‘Stranger Things’ addict? Here’s how Netflix sucked you in

One of Netflix[1]‘s highest aspirations is to get you binging on shows like Eleven wolfs down her Eggo waffles. Netflix, the world’s biggest subscription video service by members, tends to jealously guard its data. But ahead of the season 2 premiere Friday of supernatural thriller “Stranger Things[2],” the company lifted the curtain on some of the tricks it uses to entice its members into clicking play.

From tags to “taste communities,” Netflix tries to personalize its service, right down to the image you see splashed across your screen when you fire up the app. “If you look at someone else’s Netflix screen, not only will they have different titles featured,” said Todd Yellin, Netflix’s vice president of product, in a presentation to reporters last week. “Even the images around each of the titles is catered to each individual member.” It’s a rare look inside the machinations of the video service, which is aiming for global video domination one original show or movie at a time.

The stakes are high for Netflix, which said it will spend as much as £8 billion on programming next year[3]. That’s why shows like “Stranger Things” are so critical. It’s a worldwide hit, literally — the company found one person who watched the first season in Antarctica.

To help spread the word, Netflix starts by figuring out the nuances that define the show. Netflix hires taggers around the world who watch every piece of content and tag it for things like tone — tense, ominous, scary — and storyline — buddy story, missing person, family in crisis. (If you’re wondering how you could land one of these paid gigs, Netflix says they’re posted to its jobs website when they become available.)

More than one portal into the Upside Down

Netflix’s algorithm applies 12 tags to “Stranger Things” to capture nuances of how different people relate to it. That means that while some of you see “Stranger Things” in a row for TV mysteries, others find it in sci-fi thrillers.

To figure out clusters of shows and movies that seem to appeal to the same people, Netflix has identified 2,000 “taste communities.” “Stranger Things” is the most popular title in “a bunch” of those, Yellin said.

Netflix “taste communities” that rank “Stranger Things” as the most-watched title can have completely different shows rounding out their top six.

Netflix

While “Stranger Things” may top many taste communities, it doesn’t mean those lists are identical. One taste community with “Stranger Things” as No.

1 had horror items like “The Mist” and “Scream” in its top six, while another placed “Stranger Things” at the top of ahead of teen programming like “13 Reasons Why” and “Pretty Little Liars.”

Getting personal

Movie recommendations aren’t the only things Netflix personalizes. It tailors how your recommendations look, too, by specializing the image that accompanies them.

Different images worked best to draw in viewers with different TV tastes.

Netflix

Netflix found that people who like documentaries were more likely to watch “Stranger Things” if it had a picture of Chief Hopper in his uniform.

People who gravitate to action, horror and romance were more likely to click on the title with an image of Eleven staring intensely, while drama fans were most attracted to a picture of Eleven from far away. Picking the images is “a mixture of art and science,” Yellin said. The art comes from finding a diversity of strong images for the show.

Then, through an image comparison method called A/B testing, “within a day, we home in on ‘This kind of image is resonating with this kind of viewer,'” he said.

First-timers

The company also approaches promotion differently depending on whether you’ve watched a program or not. The debut of the second season, Netflix has found, is a good time to target people who haven’t watched the show at all. In the year since the first season of “Stranger Things” landed, Netflix has compiled data about people who it believes would like the show but haven’t watched yet. “Someone who hasn’t, we want them to start it at season one, episode one,” he said.

Video promotion is “the next frontier” for Netflix, Yellin said. If you watch Netflix on a TV, you’ve probably noticed it automatically playing a trailer, the opening credits or the show itself after a few seconds. But the next stage of video promotion will likely personalize the clip that unspools, much like title images are tailored today, Yellin said.

Something that sets “Stranger Things” apart from the average show on Netflix is the screen you watch it on. Generally, about two-thirds of Netflix viewing is on televisions[4] — but for “Stranger Things,” the proportion of big-screen viewing is higher. As of this month, Netflix has more than 1,200 hours of 4K content and more than 200 hours of content using an imaging technique called high dynamic range, and it says those high-quality image formats are growing in popularity.

Netflix expects viewing of “Stranger Things” season 2 to have four times as much 4K watching compared with the first season, Yellin said. All the better to capture every nook and cranny of that Eggo waffle. The Smartest Stuff[5]: Innovators are thinking up new ways to make you, and the things around you, smarter.

iHate[6]: CNET looks at how intolerance is taking over the internet.

References

  1. ^ Netflix (www.cnet.com)
  2. ^ Stranger Things (www.tvguide.com)
  3. ^ £8 billion on programming next year (www.cnet.com)
  4. ^ televisions (www.cnet.com)
  5. ^ The Smartest Stuff (www.cnet.com)
  6. ^ iHate (www.cnet.com)

Missing plane: U.S. firm in talks to use its tech to help find MH370

Why it matters to you

Hopefully Ocean Infinity can use its technology and expertise to finally solve the mystery of Flight MH370. It’s still utterly incomprehensible to many as to how a plane as large as a Boeing 777 could simply fly off into the night and never be seen again. Search teams have been making every effort to locate Malaysia Airlines’ missing aircraft after it disappeared with 239 passengers and crew during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014[1].

With the relatives of those on board MH370 still desperate to know what happened on that fateful flight more than three years ago, and an entire industry equally keen for answers to this enduring mystery, the Malaysian government is now talking to a U.S. firm about the possibility of a new search effort that could work on a “no find, no fee” basis. The government confirmed[2] in recent days that it’s in discussions with Ocean Infinity[3], a seabed exploration firm based in Houston, Texas. If it gets the green light, Ocean Infinity could bear the cost of the search effort and only receive payment if it locates the missing aircraft.

Operating from its main multi-purpose ship, Ocean Infinity uses a range of autonomous vehicles to conduct its searches, including six underwater machines that are able to operate at a depth of 6,000 meters while collecting high-definition imagery from even deeper. Six unmanned surface vehicles work with the submersibles to ensure precise positioning and constant communication, the company explains on its website.

Ocean Infinity

Searching for a missing plane[4] would be a first for Ocean Infinity, but it has growing experience using its deep-sea technology for operations such as seabed[5] mapping and imaging, marine geological surveys, and environmental monitoring.

Endless search?

With costs spiraling, lengthy multi-national search effort covering nearly 50,000 square miles of the southern Indian Ocean was called off at the start of this year. It’s believed that a future search, possibly to be conducted by Ocean Infinity, will center on an area of interest of around 10,000 square miles identified[6] by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, which the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said offers a “high probability” of revealing the missing plane.

The Malaysian government said[7] it had received “several” proposals from private firms interested in resuming the search for the missing plane, and that having assessed the inquiries it is now “negotiating the terms and conditions with Ocean Infinity.”

Editor’s Recommendations

References

  1. ^ on March 8, 2014 (www.bbc.com)
  2. ^ confirmed (twitter.com)
  3. ^ Ocean Infinity (oceaninfinity.com)
  4. ^ for a missing plane (www.digitaltrends.com)
  5. ^ seabed (www.digitaltrends.com)
  6. ^ identified (www.reuters.com)
  7. ^ said (twitter.com)

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