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Lightweight YouTube Go app rolls out to 130 countries

YouTube Go, an official Android app designed to minimize data usage, is now available in 130 countries. The app launched in India last year[1], and is designed for people in locations with poor-quality or very expensive mobile data connectivity.

Users can either watch a whole video in the app, or download it to their device or an SD card at a quality setting of their choice. Downloaded videos can be shared between devices offline using Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct.

The focus is still on countries with less-than-ideal data infrastructure, and YouTube Go is now available to download from the Google Play Store[2] in countries including Indonesia, Nigeria and Thailand.

There are no plans to launch it in countries with more established and affordable mobile internet, including the US, UK and Australia.

Android for all

YouTube Go is designed to work with Android Go[3] – a version of the mobile operating system optimized for low-end smartphones. Android Go features versions of popular apps redesigned to minimize demands on storage space, processing power and data usage.

Via TechCruch[4]

References

  1. ^ launched in India last year (www.techradar.com)
  2. ^ Google Play Store (play.google.com)
  3. ^ Android Go (www.techradar.com)
  4. ^ TechCruch (www.engadget.com)
  5. ^ The best free YouTube video converters (www.techradar.com)

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UNICEF turns graphics cards into a humanitarian tool

[embedded content]

UNICEF is taking advantage of the powerful graphics cards in gaming PCs to mine cryptocurrencies in an effort to raise funds for the 13.5 million people in need of vital emergency help in Syria. If you wish to help the cause, which UNICEF calls “the most appalling humanitarian crisis of the past twenty years,” you’ll need to download Claymore, an Etherium mining application. “Install the software Claymore and launch it to mine whenever you want, and without lifting a finger or spending a euro you will generate funds right into UNICEF’s wallet,” says the charity on its website.

At the time of writing, the fund has only raised around EUR15, which converts to approximately GBP13, £19 and AU£23.

There are four active contributors.

The project will close in 57 days.

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On the docket: Optus 5G network rollout set to begin in early 2019

In February 2017, Singtel subsidiary Optus launched its gigabit speed 4.5G network[1] in Sydney’s north-west as a trial and, at completion, managed to clock up to 2Gbps download speeds using a Huawei device.

Fast forward a year ahead and Optus has announced that it plans to begin the rollout of the next generation of mobile connectivity in early 2019.

The news of Optus’ 5G network rollout comes after the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), a consortium of telecommunications standard development organisations, met in December 2017 in Lisbon, Portugal, to finalise the standardisation of 5G technologies[3].

“People have been hearing about 5G for some time, and there is pent up expectation, but to date a lot of the talk has been highly theoretical,” said Dennis Wong, networks managing director at Optus.

“Seeing 5G data speeds through our trial that are up to 15 times faster than current technologies allows us to show the potential of this transformative technology to support a new ecosystem of connected devices in the home, the office, the paddock and in the wider community. This is a technology and future we at Optus are extremely passionate about,” he added.

The need for speed

The telco began developing its 5G technology in 2016, and although it’s still a work in progress, Optus has partnered with the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games[4] to allow visitors to preview what the fifth generation of mobile connectivity has to offer.

Optus has also added that it has “secured a variety of new metropolitan licences for its customers in the 2300 MHz and 3500 MHz spectrum bands during recent Spectrum Auctions,” thus strengthening its spectrum holdings.

Optus, however, has not revealed any specific dates or locations for the commencement of the rollout, except to say it will be made available in “key metro areas”. There is no word on what it would cost the end user either.

At present, there are no mobile devices – tablets or smartphones – that are 5G-enabled, so there is a possibility that the telco might offer home broadband plans running on its 5G network at launch. However, it’s best to wait till these plans get implemented in 2019 to see how things fall into place.

References

  1. ^ Optus launched its gigabit speed 4.5G network (www.techradar.com)
  2. ^ Best 4G network: Telstra vs Optus vs Vodafone (www.techradar.com)
  3. ^ finalise the standardisation of 5G technologies (www.techradar.com)
  4. ^ partnered with the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games (www.techradar.com)
  5. ^ 5G could be closer than you think (www.techradar.com)

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On the docket: Optus 5G network rollout set to begin in early 2019

In February 2017, Singtel subsidiary Optus launched its gigabit speed 4.5G network[1] in Sydney’s north-west as a trial and, at completion, managed to clock up to 2Gbps download speeds using a Huawei device.

Fast forward a year ahead and Optus has announced that it plans to begin the rollout of the next generation of mobile connectivity in early 2019.

The news of Optus’ 5G network rollout comes after the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), a consortium of telecommunications standard development organisations, met in December 2017 in Lisbon, Portugal, to finalise the standardisation of 5G technologies[3].

“People have been hearing about 5G for some time, and there is pent up expectation, but to date a lot of the talk has been highly theoretical,” said Dennis Wong, networks managing director at Optus.

“Seeing 5G data speeds through our trial that are up to 15 times faster than current technologies allows us to show the potential of this transformative technology to support a new ecosystem of connected devices in the home, the office, the paddock and in the wider community. This is a technology and future we at Optus are extremely passionate about,” he added.

The need for speed

The telco began developing its 5G technology in 2016, and although it’s still a work in progress, Optus has partnered with the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games[4] to allow visitors to preview what the fifth generation of mobile connectivity has to offer.

Optus has also added that it has “secured a variety of new metropolitan licences for its customers in the 2300 MHz and 3500 MHz spectrum bands during recent Spectrum Auctions,” thus strengthening its spectrum holdings.

Optus, however, has not revealed any specific dates or locations for the commencement of the rollout, except to say it will be made available in “key metro areas”. There is no word on what it would cost the end user either.

At present, there are no mobile devices – tablets or smartphones – that are 5G-enabled, so there is a possibility that the telco might offer home broadband plans running on its 5G network at launch. However, it’s best to wait till these plans get implemented in 2019 to see how things fall into place.

References

  1. ^ Optus launched its gigabit speed 4.5G network (www.techradar.com)
  2. ^ Best 4G network: Telstra vs Optus vs Vodafone (www.techradar.com)
  3. ^ finalise the standardisation of 5G technologies (www.techradar.com)
  4. ^ partnered with the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games (www.techradar.com)
  5. ^ 5G could be closer than you think (www.techradar.com)

Discounted: Products

Get premium email client Hiri free – exclusively for TechRadar readers

If you find yourself wasting time managing multiple email accounts – constantly checking messages and writing replies – Hiri[1] is the email client for you, and it’s free for TechRadar readers.

Hiri works with Microsoft Exchange, Outlook and Hotmail accounts (support for Gmail is on the way), and will change the way you use email.

Emails rarely need an instant reply, but it’s easy to fall into the trap of opening your inbox whenever a push notification appears, or the number in your browser tab ticks up by one.

Hiri solves this problem with a cleverly designed dashboard that tells you how many new messages you’ve received, and gives you a timer telling you how long to wait before reading them (half an hour is the default setting).

There’s no need to reply to emails the instant they arrive. Hiri helps you take control of your time

When you’re ready to check your mail, Hiri offers two inbox views: Unified Inbox, which displays all messages, regardless of status, and Inbox Zero, which encourages you to categorize emails by dragging them into different folders. The choice is yours, depending on the way you prefer to work.

Save time every day

Hiri is focused on saving you time and improving your productivity, and includes lots of clever design features to help you break bad habits.

For example, in the Compose window, the Subject box is at the bottom. It’s an unusual choice, but it makes sense; once you’ve written an email, you’ll have a better idea of how to summarize it for the recipient.

You’ll also notice that there are only basic writing and formatting tools. There are no fancy tables or elaborate font options; only the essentials you need to get a message across in a way that’s clear and easy to read.

At the end of the week, Hiri will give you a report grading you on your writing style, including brevity and tone. It might sound dry, but it’s a great way to tell if you’re striking the right balance – keeping things clear without sounding terse.

Hiri includes an excellent calendar for scheduling tasks and events

Hiri uses ‘Action’ and ‘FYI’ fields instead of the usual ‘To’ and ‘CC’. These perform the same function if the recipient uses a different email client, but if they have Hiri, your messages will be automatically sorted into different folders, making them easier to prioritize.

You can also attach tasks to emails, and Hiri includes an excellent calendar for managing jobs and events. There’s even a scheduling assistant so you don’t double-book yourself.

All this is yours to download and use free[3]. There’ll be a tiny eight-word message added to the end of your email signature letting recipients know you’re using Hiri, but there are no limitations on the software.

If you use Outlook, Exchange or Hotmail, Hiri is the email client for you.

References

  1. ^ Hiri (www.hiri.com)
  2. ^ Download Hiri free (www.hiri.com)
  3. ^ download and use free (www.hiri.com)
  4. ^ The best free email clients (www.techradar.com)

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