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‘Madden NFL 18’ simulation predicts the Patriots will win Super Bowl 52

The New England Patriots will defeat the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl 52, according to EA Sport’s official simulation. The Madden NFL 18 simulation predicted a closely contested matchup, with the Patriots taking home the Lombardi trophy following a 24-20 victory. The Eagles struck first on a touchdown scored by running back Jay Ajayi.

While the Patriots moved the ball down the field with relative ease in the first quarter, the Eagles defense only gave up a field goal. Philadephia notched a field goal of its own as the first quarter wound down. With the Eagles up 10-3 at the end of the first quarter, Patriots head coach Bill Belichick turned up the heat in the second, dialing up two touchdown drives.

The simulation appeared to think tight end Rob Gronkowski will be just fine after suffering a concussion in the Patriots’ comeback win against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the AFC Championship. Tom Brady found both Gronkowski and wide receiver Brandin Cooks in the end zone before the half to take a 17-10 lead. The Eagles added a field goal before halftime to cut the deficit to four.

The Eagles came out strong in the third quarter, sacking Brady two times and putting enough pressure on him to force an uncharacteristic interception. Eagles quarterback Nick Foles capitalized on Brady’s miscue, finding Alshon Jeffery for an Eagles touchdown to take a 20-17 lead heading into the fourth. Brady then led the Patriots downfield and threw his third touchdown pass of the night, this time to receiver Danny Amendola, to retake the lead at 24-20.

Later on in the quarter, Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins stripped the football from Patriots running back Dion Lewis. With time running out, Foles pushed the Eagles into Patriots territory. The backup-QB-turned-starter following Carson Wentz’s injury late in the regular season had a chance to become a Philly legend in the final seconds.

He tried to find Jeffery for the game-winning touchdown as time expired, but Patriots defensive back Stephon Gilmore batted the ball to the turf. The Patriots successfully defended its Super Bowl title while Brady snagged his fifth Super Bowl MVP honors. How’s that for breaking the Madden cover athlete curse?

Naturally, the Super Bowl still needs to be played in real life to determine the real winner, but Madden has an impressive history of picking the correct winner.

Since EA started simulating the Super Bowl in 2004, the game has correctly picked 10 of 14 contests.

And football fans know all too well not to underestimate Brady, the Madden NFL 18 cover athlete.

Editors’ Recommendations

Win a Mercedes-AMG C 43 Coupe on Super Bowl Sunday with your finger and a phone

Do you remember those contests where people place their hands on a car and after some time, the last one remaining won the car? It’s a test of endurance above all else, and Mercedes-Benz is putting a modern spin on the challenge. Starting at 6:30 p.m.

ET on Super Bowl Sunday (February 4), U.S. residents 18 and over can compete in a contest to win a 2018 Mercedes-AMG C 43 Coupe. The key feature to “Last Fan Standing” is that you can participate from anywhere. “The country will be obsessed with one game,” the video states, clearly not in reference to the Super Bowl.

And to hammer the point home, The Mercedes game begins at the same time as the big game. So you’re going to have to take your eyes off the big screen and focus on the little screen in your hand. Registration starts on Sunday, February 4 at 12:01 a.m.

ET and ends at 6:25 p.m. (5 minutes before the game starts), and the game will run until there’s one contestant left. In the case of a “deadlock,” where the game runs too long and it appears that nobody will win in a reasonably amount of time, the sponsor will select a winner at random from those remaining. The game must run for a minimum of 20 minutes.

To enter, your smartphone needs a consistent internet connection, and you must register at LastFanStanding.mbusa.com. You can also register through Facebook. Once you’re signed up, you can play a demo to practice.

You can share a Twitter post inviting others to participate in the game. If you do so, you earn one timeout break of up to five minutes. During the game, you must keep your finger on the vehicle at all times.

It won’t be standing still, however — you think they’d make it easy to win a car with a £63,140 MSRP? The luxury coupe will be moving around the screen, and there will be other distractions as well. As the game goes on, the difficulty ramps up.

If you lose power, you’re out. If your phone drops the signal, you’re out. So make sure you’re plugged in and connected to a reliable network.

We drove a 2017 C 43 Coupe and found it to be a nice upscale entry in the C-Class.

Its 3.0-liter, twin-turbocharged V6 churns out 362 horsepower and 384 pound-feet of torque.

This power, combined with comfortable and supportive seats, make the C 43 a solid and enjoyable grand tourer.

Editors’ Recommendations

Amazon's Jeff Bezos faces disaster in Super Bowl ad teaser

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.

A prime role for the CEO.

Amazon/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

What’s the worst thing that could happen to your favorite tech company? For Samsung, it might be if its phones started exploding again. For Apple, it would surely be if people stopped obsessing over it.

And for Amazon?

The company’s Super Bowl ad teaser, released on Friday, offers a dire portent of disaster. No, CEO Jeff Bezos doesn’t decide to snowboard full time. It’s worse.

Alexa loses her voice.

[embedded content]

Suddenly, she can’t communicate the weather in Austin, Texas, anymore. Now, why Austin, speculators might wonder. Is it merely because that’s where Amazon-owned Whole Foods is based?

Or could it be a sign that HQ2 is heading to Texas? I digress. Here, Bezos is far too concerned that Alexa can’t do her job.

There’s little worse for a tech CEO than when a machine can’t come to work and Bezos shows considerable acting prowess in channeling controlled concern. What’s to be done? One of his lieutenants says she has the replacements ready.

Who might they be? Real human beings on the end of a phone, perhaps? Cloned Justin Timberlakes?

Or, some might speculate, a whole army of Bezos Mini-Me’s? How painful that we’ll have to wait until February 4 to find out. I asked Siri if she had any idea who will replace her sister-in-tech.

“I don’t have an answer for that,” she said, without even a hint of a sore throat.

Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech.

Special Reports: CNET’s in-depth features in one place.

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Technically Incorrect Super Bowl Gadgets Tech Industry TV and Movies Amazon Jeff Bezos

Amazon's Jeff Bezos faces disaster in Super Bowl ad teaser

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.

A prime role for the CEO.

Amazon/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

What’s the worst thing that could happen to your favorite tech company? For Samsung, it might be if its phones started exploding again. For Apple, it would surely be if people stopped obsessing over it.

And for Amazon?

The company’s Super Bowl ad teaser, released on Friday, offers a dire portent of disaster. No, CEO Jeff Bezos doesn’t decide to snowboard full time. It’s worse.

Alexa loses her voice.

[embedded content]

Suddenly, she can’t communicate the weather in Austin, Texas, anymore. Now, why Austin, speculators might wonder. Is it merely because that’s where Amazon-owned Whole Foods is based?

Or could it be a sign that HQ2 is heading to Texas? I digress. Here, Bezos is far too concerned that Alexa can’t do her job.

There’s little worse for a tech CEO than when a machine can’t come to work and Bezos shows considerable acting prowess in channeling controlled concern. What’s to be done? One of his lieutenants says she has the replacements ready.

Who might they be? Real human beings on the end of a phone, perhaps? Cloned Justin Timberlakes?

Or, some might speculate, a whole army of Bezos Mini-Me’s? How painful that we’ll have to wait until February 4 to find out. I asked Siri if she had any idea who will replace her sister-in-tech.

“I don’t have an answer for that,” she said, without even a hint of a sore throat.

Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech.

Special Reports: CNET’s in-depth features in one place.

Share your voice

Tags

Technically Incorrect Super Bowl Gadgets Tech Industry TV and Movies Amazon Jeff Bezos

Amazon's Jeff Bezos faces disaster in Super Bowl ad teaser

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.

A prime role for the CEO.

Amazon/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

What’s the worst thing that could happen to your favorite tech company? For Samsung, it might be if its phones started exploding again. For Apple, it would surely be if people stopped obsessing over it.

And for Amazon?

The company’s Super Bowl ad teaser, released on Friday, offers a dire portent of disaster. No, CEO Jeff Bezos doesn’t decide to snowboard full time. It’s worse.

Alexa loses her voice.

[embedded content]

Suddenly, she can’t communicate the weather in Austin, Texas, anymore. Now, why Austin, speculators might wonder. Is it merely because that’s where Amazon-owned Whole Foods is based?

Or could it be a sign that HQ2 is heading to Texas? I digress. Here, Bezos is far too concerned that Alexa can’t do her job.

There’s little worse for a tech CEO than when a machine can’t come to work and Bezos shows considerable acting prowess in channeling controlled concern. What’s to be done? One of his lieutenants says she has the replacements ready.

Who might they be? Real human beings on the end of a phone, perhaps? Cloned Justin Timberlakes?

Or, some might speculate, a whole army of Bezos Mini-Me’s? How painful that we’ll have to wait until February 4 to find out. I asked Siri if she had any idea who will replace her sister-in-tech.

“I don’t have an answer for that,” she said, without even a hint of a sore throat.

Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech.

Special Reports: CNET’s in-depth features in one place.

Share your voice

Tags

Technically Incorrect Super Bowl Gadgets Tech Industry TV and Movies Amazon Jeff Bezos

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