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Product Review: NIMA USA Bluetooth Helmet Speaker – Corn Nation

I’m not one to talk about how great things are when you go tailgating. Quite simply, I’m not really a tailgater. But, when there is a quality product you should buy, I’m all about y’all finding out what it is and how good it is.

The folks at NIMA USA have come out with a quality product in their helmet Bluetooth speakers. They are licensed to host most NCAA schools, and they love their product.

[embedded content]

NIMA is the creation of CEO and Founder Nima Saati, who has created a pretty good product. The helmet comes in three sizes, and for comparison sake, I include this tweet of Florida State helmets.

The fine folks at NIMA sent me along one of their products to test out and give a critique of. Of course, I requested the Nebraska Cornhusker helmet and they came through, for which we’re much obliged.

For link purposes, you can check out the NIMA helmet here[1].

I received the small helmet from NIMA Sports the other day. The helmet came in a fairly good package, along with a SB© USB to micro cord for charging and an audio cord to connect to things other than your phone.

Brian Towle/CN

Brian Towle/CN

There’s not much this little buddy can’t do. I tried to do a lot with it, from playing my music (all 7 songs) to Facebook & Twitter videos, YouTube and even answer phone calls. The speakers are LOUD. I mean, louder than one would imagine with this product.

NIMA has an app that you can use alongside the helmet, which you can get on both the Google Play store and the App Store. Since I have a iPhone, I used the iOS app. There’s a clear way to connect to the helmet using the app, and you can pick from 7 pre-made types of playback (from rock to pop) or customize your own.

Brian Towle/CN

Overall, this should be a item that should be in your wheelhouse for tailgating, or even around the house on a gameday. The battery is set to last a while, so listening to a program, movie, or sporting event shouldn’t be a problem. The speaker boasts a connectivity of 65 feet, and it passed that test. I purposefully tried to lose the connection on the other side of the house from where I had the helmet set, and I couldn’t. Granted, it’s not 65 feet, but there could be lag at times. This wasn’t the case when I tried to do it.

If there are any complaints about the product, the first one would be that the instructions that they sent along with the helmet were in very small print. When we’re talking small, we’re talking “I can’t almost read this & my phone can’t make it bigger” small. There are manuals on the website associated with the product page, but in a pinch it would be better to make this a little bit bigger. Even with the small print, the instructions were pretty clear & concise, which would help those not technologically advanced.

The only other one would be that, when my phone was accepting a phone call, the microphone tends to pick up every noise near the helmet. That’s fine if it’s a quiet area like a bath, or bedroom. However, if in a tailgate or traffic is going by, it’s not ideal.

The first helmet comes in at $119, and yes, I think it’s worthwhile. The bigger one rings in at $399, and depending on what you want to invest it could be a great deal. Again, you can check it out at the NIMA site here[2].

Overall, I would say this would be a pretty good piece to pick up for your den, tailgate, or where ever you want to enjoy music in a wireless mode. I could see this being used for your Nebraska football, baseball or even a Nebrasketball tailgate, as well as everyday life in that mancave or sports basement you have. And it doesn’t have to be a Husker one! You can get your fave NFL team and put it there too. Heck, they even have Basketball ones coming soon for y’all.

Nima Saati has a good product here, and you should check it out.

References

  1. ^ NIMA helmet here (nimausa.com)
  2. ^ the NIMA site here (nimausa.com)

Product Review: NIMA USA Bluetooth Helmet Speaker – Corn Nation

I’m not one to talk about how great things are when you go tailgating. Quite simply, I’m not really a tailgater. But, when there is a quality product you should buy, I’m all about y’all finding out what it is and how good it is.

The folks at NIMA USA have come out with a quality product in their helmet Bluetooth speakers. They are licensed to host most NCAA schools, and they love their product.

[embedded content]

NIMA is the creation of CEO and Founder Nima Saati, who has created a pretty good product. The helmet comes in three sizes, and for comparison sake, I include this tweet of Florida State helmets.

The fine folks at NIMA sent me along one of their products to test out and give a critique of. Of course, I requested the Nebraska Cornhusker helmet and they came through, for which we’re much obliged.

For link purposes, you can check out the NIMA helmet here[1].

I received the small helmet from NIMA Sports the other day. The helmet came in a fairly good package, along with a SB© USB to micro cord for charging and an audio cord to connect to things other than your phone.

Brian Towle/CN

Brian Towle/CN

There’s not much this little buddy can’t do. I tried to do a lot with it, from playing my music (all 7 songs) to Facebook & Twitter videos, YouTube and even answer phone calls. The speakers are LOUD. I mean, louder than one would imagine with this product.

NIMA has an app that you can use alongside the helmet, which you can get on both the Google Play store and the App Store. Since I have a iPhone, I used the iOS app. There’s a clear way to connect to the helmet using the app, and you can pick from 7 pre-made types of playback (from rock to pop) or customize your own.

Brian Towle/CN

Overall, this should be a item that should be in your wheelhouse for tailgating, or even around the house on a gameday. The battery is set to last a while, so listening to a program, movie, or sporting event shouldn’t be a problem. The speaker boasts a connectivity of 65 feet, and it passed that test. I purposefully tried to lose the connection on the other side of the house from where I had the helmet set, and I couldn’t. Granted, it’s not 65 feet, but there could be lag at times. This wasn’t the case when I tried to do it.

If there are any complaints about the product, the first one would be that the instructions that they sent along with the helmet were in very small print. When we’re talking small, we’re talking “I can’t almost read this & my phone can’t make it bigger” small. There are manuals on the website associated with the product page, but in a pinch it would be better to make this a little bit bigger. Even with the small print, the instructions were pretty clear & concise, which would help those not technologically advanced.

The only other one would be that, when my phone was accepting a phone call, the microphone tends to pick up every noise near the helmet. That’s fine if it’s a quiet area like a bath, or bedroom. However, if in a tailgate or traffic is going by, it’s not ideal.

The first helmet comes in at $119, and yes, I think it’s worthwhile. The bigger one rings in at $399, and depending on what you want to invest it could be a great deal. Again, you can check it out at the NIMA site here[2].

Overall, I would say this would be a pretty good piece to pick up for your den, tailgate, or where ever you want to enjoy music in a wireless mode. I could see this being used for your Nebraska football, baseball or even a Nebrasketball tailgate, as well as everyday life in that mancave or sports basement you have. And it doesn’t have to be a Husker one! You can get your fave NFL team and put it there too. Heck, they even have Basketball ones coming soon for y’all.

Nima Saati has a good product here, and you should check it out.

References

  1. ^ NIMA helmet here (nimausa.com)
  2. ^ the NIMA site here (nimausa.com)

Don’t base your Amazon purchases on the number of reviews a … – Quartz

Quick. Which of these two products would you buy on Amazon: Thing A, which has an average rating of 2.7 stars and 258 reviews, or Thing B, which has an average rating of 2.7 stars and 14 reviews?

Did you pick Thing A? Most people pick Thing A. In a study recently published[1] in the journal Psychological Science, subjects asked to choose between hypothetical products on Amazon’s website preferred more-reviewed items to less-reviewed ones in virtually all circumstances. This isn’t terribly surprising. Though a tactic handily disproven by research[2] and observation[3], humans have a natural tendency to use popularity as an indicator of quality.

But the researchers also found that when it comes to Amazon’s ratings system, this bias toward popularity actually leads people to choose what is statistically likely to be a worse-quality product.

After analyzing 15.6 million reviews of more than 350,000 products on Amazon.com, the team built a statistical model that suggested shoppers choosing between two products with similarly poor ratings should pick the one with fewer reviews. In purely rational terms, more reviews of a poor-to-mediocre product should only increase a shopper’s confidence that it is, in fact, a poor-to-mediocre product, suggesting people should steer clear of it.

But when they posed such choices to actual humans, people did just the opposite. People’s preference for an item only increased as the number of reviews went up.

“Our research suggests that, in some cases, people might take this information [about review numbers] and make systematically bad decisions with it,” said the study’s lead author, Derek Powell, a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Stanford University.

In one experiment, researchers showed participants a pair of products with identical ratings—3.1 stars—but different review counts (29 in one case, 154 in the other). The researchers’ statistical model showed only a 40% chance that the more-reviewed product was the better one—it had, after all, received far more middling reviews than the less-reviewed alternative. Yet more than 90% of study subjects said they’d rather buy the more-reviewed option.

In fact, across 11 different conditions in which the more-reviewed product was statistically likely to be inferior, subjects opted for the morereviewed product 72.3% of the time. When it comes to consumer choices, a bias toward popularity can be self-defeating.

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References

  1. ^ study recently published (journals.sagepub.com)
  2. ^ research (www.princeton.edu)
  3. ^ observation (screenrant.com)
  4. ^ The internet is loving CNN anchor Don Lemon’s calm, razor-sharp response to Trump’s Phoenix rally (qz.com)
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